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Dissemination of Criminal Record Information Recent Changes

Executive Summary

This policy governs the use of the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) system for police services that conduct Criminal Record and Vulnerable Sector Verifications. It is based on the Ministerial Directive Concerning the Release of Criminal Record Information by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) .

In Canada, individuals may be required to have a criminal record check completed for employment, volunteer work, and other civil screening purposes. This policy identifies the various types of criminal record checks, and the requirements for accessing the CPIC system and disclosing criminal record information in support of civil screening. The policy contains specific requirements for conducting criminal record checks including obligations for: identity verification; obtaining informed consent; and, partnering with background screening companies. Police services must abide by this policy when conducting Criminal Record and Vulnerable Sector Verifications.

Criminal Record Verification: This process verifies whether an individual has a criminal record and provides any relevant details contained within the National Criminal Records Repository.

* A certified Criminal Record Verification requires fingerprints.
* Should a certified Criminal Record Verification not be required, a name-based verification may be  conducted. Individuals with a criminal record must declare their criminal record information, which a police service will confirm if the information matches a criminal record contained within the National Repository (If a match is   confirmed, a police service also has the option of providing individuals with a copy of their criminal convictions record in accordance with this policy). If a police service cannot match an individuals declaration to a criminal record contained within the National Repository, fingerprints are required.

Vulnerable Sector Verification: This process verifies whether an individual has a criminal record, including the existence of any pardoned sex offences, and provides any relevant details contained within the National Criminal Records Repository. Individuals applying to work in paid or volunteer positions where they will be in contact with children or other vulnerable persons may be required to undergo a Vulnerable Sector Verification.

 

 

*A certified Vulnerable Sector Verification requires fingerprints.
* Should a certified Vulnerable Sector Verification not be required, a name-based verification may be conducted. If the verification is inconclusive as to the existence of a pardoned sex offence, or an individual�s declared criminal record does not match a criminal record contained within the National Repository, fingerprints are required.
* A Vulnerable Sector Verification also includes a query of CPIC investigative and intelligence records, and of local police records. It is anticipated that the Ministerial Directive and this policy will remain in effect until the RCMP criminal records system is fully automated and fingerprints are required for all Criminal Record and Vulnerable Sector Verifications. Read more here


Vulnerable Sector Verifications
A Vulnerable Sector Verification is used to determine the possible existence of a criminal record and/or a sexual offence conviction for which an individual has received a pardon. In some cases, fingerprints may be required for submission to the RCMP National Repository of Criminal Records to complete the verification......; Any individual applying to work in a paid or volunteer position where they will be in contact with a vulnerable person may be required to complete a Vulnerable Sector Verification. Some examples of positions involving members of the vulnerable sector are: teachers, social workers, day-care workers, sport coaches and volunteers. Read more here

Task force considers fingerprinting and credit checks for federal workers
The Government of Canada may replace the traditional criminal record name check with credit checks and fingerprinting, according to a story in The Ottawa Citizen. Read more here

HR departments are using technology to weed out candidates with criminal records
More and more employers--from mortgage firms to hospitals--are requiring that job applicants submit to background checks. Fingerprinting is becoming a more common part of these checks, especially in highly sensitive workplaces where security is essential.      Companies that employ workers in charge of securing a worksite--for example, airports, the financial services industry, hospitals, schools, the gaming industry and hazardous materials services--are particularly vulnerable to the effects of exposure to applicants with criminal backgrounds. Read more here